Explain platos form of the good

The pre-Socratic philosophersstarting with Thalesnoted that appearances change, and began to ask what the thing that changes "really" is. The answer was substancewhich stands under the changes and is the actually existing thing being seen. The status of appearances now came into question. What is the form really and how is that related to substance?

Explain platos form of the good

Plato’s Cave Metaphor and Theory of the Forms

Plato sets himself to answering two questions: In the process of answering these questions, he defends a sublime theory of the nature of reality and human knowledge. Few, says Plato, really understand the nature of the Good itself e.

To understand the Good itself, Plato relies on an analogy with the sun. There are visible objects, which are visible but not intelligible in themselves.

Then there are the Forms themselves, which are intelligible but not visible b. The Form of the Good, Plato says, is to the intelligible realm as the sun is to the visible realm. We need sight in ourselves and color in objects, but we also need the sun, or light, to make those things really visible, detectable by us.

Sight receives its power to see from the sun, as if from an overflowing treasury. Likewise, the intelligible realm receives its order and intelligibility from the Form of the Good.

Form of the Good - Wikipedia

The connection here may seem tenuous, but this much is clear: This is presumably what Plato means. In the intelligible realm, the Form of the Good plays the same role: Nowadays, we might compare the Form of the Good to laws of nature, though this is not fully satisfying, since the Form of the Good is not particular law of nature, but the reason why there are laws at all.

Consider the subject of mathematics and geometry. What is a point? It is a location in space with no dimension. In other words, it is not a real object.

Points are ideal entities, not space-time particulars.

Explain platos form of the good

They take up no space. Likewise, lines have length but no breadth. If we live in a rationally ordered cosmos, this helps underwrite a social order that is rigidly hierarchical.

It is no surprise then that through the Middle ages humans organize themselves into strict hierarchies. We find a hierarchical church and a stratified social structure, with serfs serving the king and the king serving God.

The Form of the Good is the ground of all being, an immaterial object that exists more perfectly than anything else, a thing responsible for the goodness and rationality in the world. This is something like an interpretation of the Christian view of God developed in the Middle Ages, founded in Platonic and Neo-Platonic metaphysics.

Science is only possible if the natural world is intelligible to our rational faculties.Sep 22,  · Plato form of the good-most important form is the form of the good, highest form and the source of all other forms - it represents the sun in the allegory of .

Explain Plato’s Form of the Good. Plato believed that the world we around us is an illusion, and that everyday things that we take for granted are merely weak imitations of the true object behind it.

Form of the Good - Wikipedia

He believed that behind every earthly object, and every earthly concept (e.g. beauty), there is an unearthly truth; a perfect version. ‘Explain what Plato meant by the Form of the Good’ (25) Plato believed in two worlds, the material world and the world of the Forms.

The Forms differ from material objects because they are perfect and pure; while material objects are a complex mixture of imperfect properties of the Forms.

Form of the Good - Among the Forms, one stands out as most important.

Explain platos form of the good

This is the Form of the Good. This is the Form of the Good. Plato is unable to tell us exactly what the Form of The Good is, but he does tell us that it is the source of intelligibility and of our capacity to know, and also that it is responsible for bringing all of the other Forms into existence.

Plato's Theory of Forms shaped many of his other philosophical tenets. For example, when it comes to ethics, Plato argues that we have a moral duty to use reason to pursue the knowledge of the Forms.

‘Explain what Plato meant by the Form of the Good’ (25) Plato believed in two worlds, the material world and the world of the Forms. The Forms differ from material objects because they are perfect and pure; while material objects are a complex mixture of imperfect properties of the Forms.

Plato's Ethics: An Overview (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)